March 12th, 2021

MTM Gun Cleaning Patch Catcher — Works Great, Under $10!

MTM Case-Gard patch gun cleaning patch catcher green plastic box maintenance

Are you tired of making a mess in your gun room and picking up patches off the floor? If you clean at the range, would you like to make life much easier (no hunting for patches on dirty ground)? Then consider the MTM Gun Cleaning Patch Catcher. It is currently just $9.19 on Grafs.com and $9.89 on Amazon.

This handy see-through green container fits on the end of your rifle or shotgun barrel. It works with all patch types and bore sizes and fits virtually all barrel diameters, large and small. Simply slip the MTM Gun Cleaning Patch Catcher over your barrel to contain all the patches pushed out the muzzle. No more mess and stains on your bench/table. When cleaning tasks are done, simply remove the Patch Catcher and dump the contents into the trash. Watch the video to see how the MTM Patch Catcher works. Note how it also retains the solvent spray and/or drips.

One owner explains: “This box straps over the muzzle end of a barrel and keeps the mess completely contained. Excess cleaning solvents collect in the bottom. Patches fall off the jag and are captured as well when the cleaning rod is withdrawn. It also completely contains the splatter burst when a bore brush exits the muzzle of whatever firearm is being cleaned.” (D.J. Bradley)

MTM Case-Gard patch gun cleaning patch catcher green plastic box maintenance

MTM Case-Gard patch gun cleaning patch catcher green plastic box maintenance

MTM Case-Gard patch gun cleaning patch catcher green plastic box maintenance

Here are actual user reviews from verified customers:

“It’s been a long time since I bought something that is just WOW brilliant but this patch catcher is just that. It is so simple, so neat, so clean and so effective. It fits perfectly on all my rifle barrels and catches patches, brush spray and most importantly most of the smells of solvents. I can now clean my rifles in the house without inviting the wrath of my darling wife.” — Emmitt P. (Amazon)

“The MTM Patch Catcher works great! It is easy to adjust to different size barrels, and … all the gunk stays in the trap! Now, no more cleaning up the work bench/floor area after gun cleaning. This trap is a must have! I never knew I needed one of these until I got the MTM one from Graf’s. My buddy had a different brand, and it was hard to use. On his, the trap that holds the dirty patches and ‘juice’ would not stay in place, and some times most of the gunk ended up on the floor.” — Michael T (Grafs.com)

“This little device is more than a patch catcher. It also contains that dirty, smelly spray when a bore bristle exits the barrel. With the [MTM Patch Catcher] top open, it will also catch spray cleaners and lubes when used on small parts.” — TwoBoxer (Amazon)

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March 12th, 2021

Stainless Steel & Corrosion Resistance — What You Need to Know

Benchmark stainless steel barrel barrels match
Most modern match rifle barrels are stainless steel alloy. These are from Benchmark Barrels.

Though some grades of stainless are more corrosion-resistent, ALL varieties of stainless steel can rust if they are not handled and stored properly.

Some folks feel that they don’t have to worry about rust and corrosion on stainless steel barrels, actions, and other components. That’s not really true. “Stainless” is a bit of a misnomer. First, there are different types of stainless steel alloys, with different degrees of rust resistance. 300 series stainless is more corrosion resistant than the 416 stainless commonly used in barrels. The composition (by percentage weight) of 416 stainless is 0.15% carbon, 12-14% chromium and the rest iron. 416 stainless steel lacks the roughly 10% nickel content that makes the 300 series more corrosion resistant in atmospheric conditions. But because 416 handles pressure better and is easier to machine (than 300 series steel), 416 stainless remains the better choice for barrels.

stainless steel barrel Techshooter

Though some grades of stainless are more corrosion-resistent, ALL varieties of stainless steel can rust if they are not handled and stored properly. Forum reader Kells81 observed: “Wanna see some rusted stainless? Go to the big “C” brand store in Ft. Worth. Every stainless gun they have on the used gun rack is rusted.” Tom Easly of TRE Custom explains: “Sweat is very corrosive. Sweat and blood will rust many stainless steels. I hate to handle my guns or drip on them when I sweat. It really helps to just wipe them good with a wet rag, dry and wipe on a light coating of gun oil. I think most stainless barrels are made from type 416 stainless, and it is generally pretty corrosion resistant, but not when exposed to sweat, blood, or chlorates (corrosive priming), and some other electrolytes.”

Forum member Jacob, who is studying materials science at LSU, provides this technical information: “The basic resistance of stainless steel occurs because of its ability to form a protective coating on the metal surface. This coating is a ‘passive’ film which resists further ‘oxidation’ or rusting. The formation of this film is instantaneous in an oxidizing atmosphere such as air, water, or other fluids that contain oxygen. Once the layer has formed, we say that the metal has become ‘passivated’ and the oxidation or ‘rusting’ rate will slow down to less than 0.002″ per year (0.05 mm per year).

Unlike aluminum or silver, this passive film is invisible in stainless steel. It’s created when oxygen combines with the chrome in the stainless to form chrome oxide which is more commonly called ‘ceramic’. This protective oxide or ceramic coating is common to most corrosion resistant materials.

Halogen salts, especially chlorides, easily penetrate this passive film and will allow corrosive attack to occur. The halogens are easy to recognize because they end in the letters ‘ine’. Listed in order of their activity they are: fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, astatine.

These are the same chemicals that will penetrate Teflon and cause trouble with Teflon coated or encapsulated o-rings and/ or similar coated materials. Chlorides are one of the most common elements in nature and if that isn’t bad enough, they’re also soluble, active ions. These provide the basis for electrolytes. The presence of electrolytic solutions can accelerate corrosion or chemical attack.”

CONCLUSION: Stainless steel barrels and components won’t rust nearly as fast as blued steel, but you still have to take precautions — particularly removing sweat and corrosive salts from the barrel. Also, don’t let moisture build up inside or outside of the barrel. We recommend wiping your barrels and actions with Eezox, or Corrosion-X after each use. These are both extremely effective rust-fighters that go on thin, without leaving a greasy residue. (Eezox leaves a clear finish, while Corrosion-X has a slightly waxy finish.) Also store your guns in Bore-Store bags when the guns go in the safe. Bore-Stores wick away moisture, and the synthetic fleece inner surface is treated with rust-fighting chemicals. Bore-Stores also protect your guns against dings and scratches.

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