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December 31st, 2022

Saturday at the Movies: Six Notable Ultimate Reloader Videos

Ultimate reloader gavin gear longshot camera AMP press anschutz rifle 7mm PRC 6.5 PRC 300 muzzle brake videos

UltimateReloader.com offers some of the most thorough firearms and reloading tool tests on the internet. And UltimateReloader’s YouTube Channel has hundreds of great videos that showcase reloading tools, accurate firearms, precision optics, gunsmithing methods, and top-tier reloading components. For today’s Saturday at the Movies feature, we showcase six great videos recently created by Gavin Gear and his UltimateReloader team. These videos highlight a superb Long-Range Target Camera, the remarkable AMP Press, the new Hornady PRC cartridges, and other interesting topics. On this final day of 2022, enjoy our Saturday Video Showcase.

With the high price of centerfire powders, bullets, and brass, everyone should have an accurate .22 LR rimfire rifle for marksmanship training and competition at 25 to 200 yards. In this video, Ultimate Reloader’s Gavin Gear tests the impressive Anschutz 54.18 BR50-U7 match rifle using a quality Sinclair Int’l front rest. Anschutz offers several versions of the 54.18 and BR-50. There are two barreled actions available: 20″ threaded and 25.9″ non-threaded. Gavin tested the 20″ threaded model with the U7 stock. In this video, Gavin tested the trigger with a sophisticated TriggerScan TS-11. The trigger was superbly repeatable at a measured 3.8 ounces. Gavin also did a bore examination. He then tested the Anschutz with a variety of premium ammo. In this rifle, Lapua Midas+ producing the smallest groups. FULL STORY HERE.

This video features the impressive, high-tech AMP Bullet Seating Press. The AMP Press combines a motor driven ram, a distance sensor, and a load cell to deliver extremely accurate and precise force/distance bullet seating measurements. The AMP Press offers unrivaled consistency in the bullet seating process. And as the AMP Press is linked to a computer, seating data can be stored and you can chart variations in seating resistance. A wealth of precise data is collected during the bullet seating process. This helps you optimize your brass prep and annealing for the best, most consistent results. FULL STORY HERE.

Past 400 yards or so, it can be difficult to see bullet holes on paper, even with spotting scopes. That’s why we recommend a high-quality wireless target camera. The best long-range target cameras on the market are produced by Longshot Camera Systems. The Longshot Target Cam provides a live WiFi camera feed. This comes back to your shooting station and you can view the image with a laptop or mobile device. You don’t need internet coverage and no separate tall antennas are required. Simply place the camera unit next to your target and the receiver unit close to your rifle or bench. The Longshot system is completely self-contained. Longshot produces a variety of cameras starting at $449.00 for the LongShot Marksman. We recommend the $899.00 LR-3 unit which works out to two miles! In this video Gavin Gear of UltimateReloader tests the LR-3 at long range. PRODUCT INFO HERE.

This video examines how muzzle brakes reduce recoil. Just how important is bore clearance for a muzzle brake? Should you have an exit diameter that’s just slightly larger than bullet diameter, or will a larger diameter work well also? Along with no brake at all (bare muzzle), Ultimate Reloader tested multiple different brake bore clearances on a 6.5 Creedmoor rifle: 0.010″ over bullet diameter, 0.020″, 0.030″, 0.050″, 0.100″, and 0.200″. The testers expected to get the best recoil reduction with the tightest fit. Surprisingly, this wasn’t quite the case.

Ultimate reloader gavin gear muzzle brake bore clearance video

Using all brake configurations (all bore clearances) Ultimate Reloader saw a significant reduction in recoil, almost half, as compared to a bare muzzle: “What we didn’t expect was how close together the rest of the clearances would cluster. All of the clearances that we tested had good recoil reduction.” FULL STORY HERE.

Dillon Precision continues to be the leader among progressive press makers. Dillon offers the largest variety of progressives, the most accessories, and legendary customer service. In this video, Gavin Gear of Ultimate Reloader looks at a variety of Dillon machines to help buyers decide which progressive best suits their needs. Featured Dillon progressives include: Square Deal B, Xl750, and RL1100. Along with basic press feature, Gavin shows the operation of Dillon’s automated bullet feeder and case feeder accessories. The video also provides pricing summaries with various configurations. FULL STORY HERE.

Hornady’s PRC (Precision Rifle Cartridge) family of cartridges are becoming quite popular. The 6.5 PRC fits in a short action, while the 7mm PRC and 300 PRC both require a long action. The 7mm PRC is a long-action centerfire hunting cartridge designed to shoot 180gr bullets at 2950+ FPS. The 6.5 PRC is a good hunting cartridge that can fit a standard-length action. And, a number of top F-Open shooters are necking up the 6.5 PRC for 7mm bullets. This 7-6.5 PRC wildcat has shown excellent F-Class accuracy with a higher velocity node than the .284 Winchester. Along with these two cartridges, Hornady has a 300 PRC that can shoot the big .308-caliber bullets. In this video, Ultimate Reloader analyzes and compares each of the three PRC cartridge types. FULL STORY HERE.

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December 31st, 2022

When Ammo Catches Fire — SAAMI Video Shows Surprising Truth

With major forest fires this past year in Western states, many have wondered about hazards faced by gun owners in fire zones. This important video shows what really happens when loaded ammunition burns. You will probably be surprised. Contrary to Hollywood notions, the ammo doesn’t ignite in a massive explosion. Far from it… basically the rounds “cook off” one by one, and the bullets release at relatively low velocity. We’ve featured this SAAMI research project before, but it is worth reprising for those who have not yet seen the burn tests.

A few years back, SAAMI released an important video concerning ammo and fire. With professional fire-fighters standing by, over 400,000 rounds of ammo were incinerated in a series of eye-opening tests. If you haven’t had the chance to view this video yet, you should take the time to watch it now

The Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI) has produced an amazing 25-minute video that shows what actually happens to sporting ammunition involved in a fire. This video shows the results of serious tests conducted with the assistance of professional fire crews. We strongly recommend you watch this video, all the way through. It dispels many myths, while demonstrating what really happens when ammunition is burned, dropped, or crushed.

Watch SAAMI Ammunition Testing Video

Video Timeline

  • 2:10 Impact Test (ignited outside firearm)
  • 3:40 65-foot Drop Test
  • 5:08 Bullet Impact (.308 Win firing)
  • 7:55 Blasting Cap Attacks
  • 9:55 Bulldozer and Forklift Tests
  • 12:20 Boxed Ammo Bonfire
  • 15:37 Bonfire without Packaging
  • 17:21 Retail Store Simulation Burn
  • 20:55 Truck Trailer Burn

Over 400,000 rounds of ammunition were used in the tests. Some of the footage is quite remarkable. Testers built a bonfire with 28,000 rounds of boxed ammo soaked in diesel fuel. Then the testers loaded five pallets of ammo (250,000 rounds) in the back of a semi-truck, and torched it all using wood and paper fire-starting materials doused with diesel fuel.

The video shows that, when ammo boxes are set on fire, and ammunition does discharge, the bullet normally exits at low speed and low pressure. SAAMI states: “Smokeless powders must be confined to propel a projectile at high velocity. When not in a firearm, projectile velocities are extremely low.” At distances of 10 meters, bullets launched from “cooked-off” ammo would not penetrate the normal “turn-out gear” worn by fire-fighters.

We are not suggesting you disregard the risks of ammo “cooking off” in a fire, but you will learn the realities of the situation by watching the video. There are some amazing demonstrations — including a simulated retail store fire with 115,000 rounds of ammo in boxes. As cartridges cook off, it sounds like a battery of machine-guns, but projectiles did not penetrate the “store” walls, or even two layers of sheet-rock. The fire crew puts out the “store fire” easily in under 20 seconds, just using water.

Additional Testing: Drop Test, Projectile Test, Crush Test, Blasting Cap Test

Drop Test
The video also offers interesting ammo-handling tests. Boxes of ammo were dropped from a height of 65 feet. Only a tiny fraction of the cartridges discharged, and there was no chain-fire. SAAMI concludes: “When dropped from extreme heights (65 feet), sporting ammunition is unlikely to ignite. If a cartridge ignites, it does not propagate.”

Rifle Fire Test
SAAMI’s testers even tried to blow up boxes of ammunition with rifle fire. Boxes of loaded ammo were shot with .308 Win rounds from 65 yards. The video includes fascinating slow-motion footage showing rounds penetrating boxes of rifle cartridges, pistol ammo, and shotgun shells. Individual cartridges that were penetrated were destroyed, but adjacent cartridges suffered little damage, other than some powder leakage. SAAMI observed: “Most of the ammunition did not ignite. When a cartridge did ignite, there was no chain reaction.”

Bulldozer Crush Test
The test team also did an amazing “crush-test” using a Bulldozer. First boxes of loaded ammo, then loose piles of ammo, were crushed under the treads of a Bulldozer. A handful of rounds fired off, but again there was no chain-fire, and no large explosion. SAAMI observed: “Even in the most extreme conditions of compression and friction, sporting ammunition is unlikely to ignite. [If it does ignite when crushed] it does not propagate.”

Blasting Cap Test
Perhaps most amazingly, the testers were not able to get ammunition to chain-fire (detonate all at once), even when using blasting caps affixed directly to live primers. In the SAAMI test, a blasting cap was placed on the primer of a round housed in a large box of ammo. One cartridge ignited but the rest of the boxed ammo was relatively undamaged and there was no propagation.

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December 31st, 2022

Wheelguns Worth Small Fortunes — Single Digit Colt Pythons

Colt Python Snake NRA Museum low serial number pistol
Photos courtesy NRABlog.com.

Each day, on Facebook, the NRA National Firearms Museum showcases something special from the Museum collections. A while back the Museum displayed a trio of snakes — three very special Colt Pythons. From bottom to top, these three prized wheelguns are: Colt Python serial number 2, number 3, and number 5. And yes, that is the original box for Python #2 (at bottom). The museum says such low serial number guns were typically produced for a company executive or key members of the gun design team.

Colt Python Snake NRA Museum low serial number pistol

Loved for their beautiful finish, nice balance, and great trigger, Colt Pythons have proven to be excellent investments. Since the Colt Python was first introduced in 1955, Python prices have gone through the roof. A pristine, LNIB early-era Colt Python can now command very high values in the thousands. And these rare single digit examples might sell for over $15,000+, as estimated by the NRA museum. How much did a Python cost in 1955? You could purchase the Royal Blue model for just $125.00! Factory-engraved models started at $245.00, according to this Colt advertisement from June, 1955:

Colt Python Snake NRA Museum low serial number pistol

History and Design Evolution of Colt Python Revolvers

You can see hundreds of other interesting firearms on the National Firearm Museum website, www.NRAMuseum.com. Or, if you’re lucky, you can see the collections in person. The NRA now operates three Museum locations: the NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, Virginia; the NRA National Sporting Arms Museum in Springfield, MO; and the Frank Brownell Museum of the Southwest in Raton, NM.

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December 30th, 2022

FREE Downloadable Targets for Practice, Precision, and Fun

AccurateShooter Free downloadable print targets shooting paper PDF

The paper targets you use can make a big difference during load development and training — helping you align your crosshairs, estimate group size visually, and also record load data/gun type. Here’s a collection of FREE printable precision and training targets. This selection includes popular load development targets AccurateShooter created as well as other useful grid targets. You can download ALL these targets as PDF files and then print them out on 8.5×11″ heavy paper.

AccurateShooter.com offers an online archive with over 50 FREE downloadable targets. You’ll find all types of FREE targets — sight-in targets, varmint targets, rimfire targets, bullseye targets, tactical targets, load development targets and more. CLICK HERE for all our free targets, including our LOAD DEV target.

FREE Accuracy Precision Rifle Shooting Target
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PDF TARGET

Since we created this target a decade ago, it has proven very popular as a load development target, since all your load data fits neatly in the boxes under each target. In fact this target is used by both rifle-makers and barrel-makers (including Criterion) to test their products. The diamonds have 1/2″ sides and you can align your cross-hairs on the horizontal and vertical lines. It is a clean design that is easy to see even at 200 yards. When we test, we usually crank in a little elevation, setting the point-of-impact higher. That way our shots land in the gray circles, leaving the red squares intact for precise aiming.

Load Development and OCW Target


CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PDF TARGET

This is a nicely-designed six-bull grid target. Use this for load development or accuracy testing. Set your scope so you can aim at the orange diamonds while your shots impact in the box above. This target has a visible background grid so it is easy to estimate your group size. You’ll find other load development targets in this Shooters’ Forum Thread.

Five Diamond Grid Targets

Here’s a popular grid target with multiple red diamond aiming points. The background includes a grid pattern with 1″ squares — that helps to quickly estimate group size through your scope. We recommend using a color printer for this target so the diamonds and grid lines are bright red.

If you don’t have a color printer, there are similar color grid targets available on Amazon for a modest price. For example, the Champion Redfield Target 10-Pack is currently on sale for just $3.00 on Amazon. Or get the larger 17″x25″ Dynamic Shooters 5-Diamond Grid 50-pack for $23.98 on Amazon

AccurateShooter Free downloadable print targets shooting paper diamond grid red PDF
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PDF TARGET

Versatile Targets with Multiple Aiming Points

We use the two targets below for load development and precision practice. For the left target, use the corners of the diamonds to align your cross-hairs precisely. The circle dot target (on the right) can also be used for informal rimfire competition at 50 yards. Right-Click Each Target to Download Printable PDFs.

FREE Accuracy Precision Rifle Shooting Target FREE Accuracy Precision Rifle Shooting Target

Know-Your-Limits Target for Rimfire Training & Fun Matches

Here’s a rimfire training target with “big to small” target circles. Start with the largest circles, then move to the smaller ones in sequence. This systematic drill provides increasing challenge shot-by-shot. Novices often are quite surprised to see their accuracy improve as they move from bigger to smaller aiming points. That provides positive feedback — always a good thing.

know limits nrl22 rimfire tactical target></a><br />
<a href=CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PDF TARGET

Twin Row Target Circles for Load Development

AccurateShooter Free downloadable print targets shooting paper PDF
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PDF TARGET

This target was created using Open Office (Draw) by Forum member TwoBoxer for 100-yard load development and practice. He tells us: “The color, size of the center dot, crosshair lines, etc. were varied to work with my scope and magnification at 100 yards. I expect the group POI to move as elements of the load are varied. So concern about obliterating the aim point is minimal, and needs to be controlled by how you zero the rifle in any case.”

RED Center Pistol Target

Here’s a NRA-type target for pistol shooting. The bright red center helps when shooting indoors because well-placed bullet holes are much more visible. This target includes data entry boxes to record gun type, score, and load data. This is one of many good free targets available at Targets4free.com.

targets4free free target NRA pistol red center rings
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PDF TARGET

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December 30th, 2022

Electronic Locks vs. Dial Locks for Gun Safes — Expert Advice

Cannon EMP dual lok
Dual-Lock Technology: Cannon offers an innovative combined digital/mechanical lock system. This dual-access lock provides the rapid access of an electronic lock backed up by the assurance of a manual (rotary dial) combination lock.

Electronic (Keypad) Lock vs. Manual (Rotary) Lock

Smart gun owners know they need a good, solid gun safe. But when choosing a gun safe, what kind of lock should you select — electronic or mechanical? Both types have their advantages and disadvantages. This article will help you make the right choice for your needs and also get the most reliable performance from either type.

gunsafe gun safeGunsafes can be fitted with either an electronic keypad-style lock, or a conventional dial lock. In our Gunsafe Buyer’s Guide, we explain the important features of both dial and electronic lock systems. Many safe-makers will tell you that consumers prefer electronic locks for convenience. On the other hand, most of the locksmiths we’ve polled believe that the “old-fashioned” dial locks, such as the Sargent & Greenleaf model 6730, will be more reliable in the long run.

Here is the opinion of RFB from Michigan. He is a professional locksmith with over two decades of experience servicing locks and safes of all brands and types:

What a Professional Locksmith Says:
For the convenience of quick opening, the electronic locks can’t be beat. However, for endurance and years of trouble-free use, the electronics can’t compare with the dial lock.

I’ve earned my living, the past 22 years, servicing locks of all types. This includes opening safes that can’t otherwise be opened. I do warranty work for several safe manufacturers (including Liberty). What I’ve learned in all those years is that manual dial locks have very few problems. The most common is a loose dial ring which can shift either left or right, which will result in the index point being in the wrong place for proper tumbler alignment. This is simple to fix.

Electronic locks, however, can have all kinds of issues, and none (except bad key-pad) are easy to fix, and when one goes bad, it must be drilled into to open it. IMO, it’s not a matter of ‘if’ an electronic lock will ultimately fail, but a matter of ‘when’ it will fail. Over the past 10 years or so, since electronics have become more and more prevalent, I’ve had to drill open bad electronic locks vs. bad manual dial locks on a ratio of about 20-1.

My professional opinion is to get the manual dial lock, unless you’ve got a good friend who is a locksmith/safecracker.

How Secure is Your Lock?
RFB tells us that both dial and electronic locks offer good security, provided it’s a good quality lock made by LaGard, Sargent & Greenleaf, Amsec, or Kaba/Ilco. However, RFB warns that “Some of the ‘cheaper’ locks (both manual and electronic) however, are very simple to bypass.

An electronic lock that’s glued or ‘stuck’ to the door with double-sided tape, and has its ‘brain’ on the outside of the lock in the same housing as the keypad, and merely sends power to an inner solenoid via a pair of wires through the door, is a thief’s best friend. The good ones have the brain inside the safe, inaccessible from the outside.

No amateur can ‘manipulate’ either a good manual or electronic lock. Both give you a theoretical one million possible combinations. I say ‘theoretical’ because there are many combinations that cannot, or should not, be used. You wouldn’t set your combo on a dial lock to 01-01-01 etc., nor would you set an electronic to 1-1-1-1-1-1, or 1-2-3-4-5-6.”

Tips for Dial Locks
RFB notes that “The speed, and ease of use, of a manual dial lock can be improved upon, simply by having your combo reset using certain guidelines. Avoid high numbers above 50. Having a 1st number in the 40s, 2nd number anywhere from 0-25, and 3rd number between 25 and 35 will cut dialing time in half, without compromising security. (For mechanical reasons I won’t get into here, the 3rd number of a good manual dial lock cannot — or should not — be set to any number between 95 & 20).”

Tips for Electronic Locks
Electronic locks can have the combination changed by the user much more easily than dial locks. That should be a good thing. However, RFB explains: “That can be a double-edged sword. More than a few times I’ve had to drill open a safe with an electronic lock that has had the combo changed incorrectly by the user, resulting in an unknown number that nobody can determine. Also, don’t forget that electronic locks have a ‘wrong-number lock-out’. I would NOT rely on the normal quickness of an electronic 6-number combo in an emergency situation. If for any reason (panic etc.) you punch in the wrong number several times, the lock will shut down for a 5-minute ‘penalty’.

Replace Electronic Lock Batteries Every Year
To get the most life out of any electronic (keypad Lock), you should change the battery at least once a year, whether it needs it or not. Low voltage won’t necessarily shut down the lock, but using it in a low voltage situation is bad for the electronics, and eventually will cause lock failure. So, If you do nothing else to maintain your digital-lock safe, replace the battery every year.

And get a fresh battery (with a release date) from the store — don’t just pull a battery out of a storage bin, even if it’s never been used. Old batteries can lost “juice” and physically degrade, even when in storage.

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December 29th, 2022

Wind Reading Wisdom from Bryan Litz and Emil Praslick III

Wind reading coaching bryan litz Ben Avery Phoenix wind video

Wind effects are complex. In trying to access wind speeds and angles, you’ll want to watch multiple indicators — mirage, dust, wind-flags, grass movement, and more. You’ll also need to be concerned about wind cycles. In the video below, Bryan Litz talks about variable wind speed along a bullet’s flight path. A respected ballistics guru, Bryan is the founder of Applied Ballistics and a designer of Berger’s Hybrid Match projectiles. He is also a past F-TR National Champion and a High Master Palma ace.

In this video, Bryan discusses how wind effects can vary in intensity at different points along the bullet’s flight path to the target. Sometimes the firing line is sheltered, and the strongest winds come into effect in the middle of the trajectory. Bryan concludes: “Wind matters everywhere … but the best thing you can do is try to get a handle on the wind [velocity and angle] where you are. That may or may not represent the wind down-range — that’s when you have to look downrange and make a judgment[.]”

Litz Competition Tip: Select your wind shooting strategy carefully. For beginners and veterans, most points are typically lost to wind. Successful shooters put a lot of thought into their approach to wind shooting. Sometimes it’s best to shoot fast and minimize the changes you’ll have to navigate. Other times it’s best to wait out a condition which may take several minutes. Develop a comfortable rest position so you have an easier time waiting when you should be waiting.

More Wind Tips from Wind Wizard Emil Praslick
In these two short videos, Emil Praslick III, former coach of the USAMU and USA National long range teams, explains how to find the wind direction and how to confirm your no-wind zero. Praslick is widely considered to be one of the best wind coaches in the USA.

When Winds Are EXTREME — Near Gale Force at Ben Avery

This video shows INSANE winds at NBRSA 100/200 Benchrest Nationals. This was filmed at the Ben Avery Range in Phoenix, AZ during the recent NBRSA 100/200 yard National Championships. Extreme to say the least. Based on what we’re seeing here, there are 20-25 mph crosswinds, with gusts to 35 mph — near Gale Force. Video by Hall-of-Fame Benchrest competitor Gene Bukys, whom we sadly lost to COVID last year. RIP Gene.

Texas gunsmith Mike Bryant reports: “This video shows the Unlimited Class 200 at the Nationals in Phoenix. I had three 10-shot groups in the low 2″ range with a 2.228″ being my big group and was glad they weren’t bigger. Thursday and Friday were the worst of the windy days. Unfortunately those were the days for the UL 200 and it was about as windy through most all of the Sporter 200.”

Excellent Wind Reading Resource

The Wind Book for Rifle Shooters covers techniques and tactics used by expert wind-readers. The authors provide a wind-reading “toolbox” for calculating wind speed, direction, deflection and drift. They explain how to read flags and mirage, record and interpret your observations, and time your shots to compensate for wind. Here are two reviews:

This is a must-have book if you are a long-range sport shooter. I compete in F-Class Open and when read it from cover to cover, it helped me understand wind reading and making accurate scope corrections. Buy this book, read it, put into practice what it tells you, you will not be disappointed. — P. Janzso

If you have one book for wind reading, this should be it. It covers how to get wind speed/direction from flags, mirage, and natural phenomenon. This is the best book for learning to read wind speed and direction. — Muddler

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December 29th, 2022

The World of Cartridges — Guide to Cartridge and Primer Types

pew pew tactical bullet cartridge photos rimfire primer illustration

The Pew Pew Tactical website has interesting article on rifle and pistol cartridges and bullet types. This contains a large selection of interesting photographs and illustrations. If you load and/or shoot for a wide variety of cartridge types, you’ll find that article well worth reading. It has nearly 50 photographs and more than a dozen short videos. READ FULL Article.

pew pew tactical bullet cartridge photos rimfire primer illustration

The article shows all types of pistol bullets, along with a variety of rifle projectiles. It even illustrates multiple types of shotshell cartridges.

The article also explains the basic components of modern cartridges –bullet, case, powder, and primer:

ammunitiontogo.com ammo case cutaway
Photo courtesy Ammunitiontogo.com which sells ammo from many leading brands.

pew pew tactical bullet cartridge photos rimfire primer illustrationPopular Cartridge Types Profiled
The article provides quick summaries of popular ammunition types including 9mm Luger (9x19mm), .357 Magnum, .40 SW, .45 ACP, .223 Rem, and .308 Winchester. The author’s favorite pistol round is the 9mm Luger: “9mm is my personal favorite and if there was a “Goldilocks” round, this would be it. The very first gun I bought was a 9mm. They’re fun at the range. They’re good for defense. It is the standard round for NATO countries and the majority of police forces around the world. It is mild shooting, can vary in weight from 115 to 147 grains, and has varying stopping power based on the type of bullet.”

This Pew-Pew Tactical guide to cartridge types also provides a quick explanation of cartridge ignition — both centerfire and rimfire: “The rimfire’s primer is built into the rim while the centerfire cartridge has the primer in the center. Pro tip — if you can see a circle in the middle…it’s a centerfire cartridge.”

There are two common types of centerfire primers — Boxer and Berdan. This helpful Wikipedia illustration shows how Boxer, Berdan, and rimfire primers ignite the powder in the cartridge:


Berdan boxer rimfire primer gif animation illustration


This centerfire and rimfire ignition animation is by BBODO – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0 licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 license.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading, Tech Tip No Comments »
December 29th, 2022

Protect Expensive Optics with Fitted Neoprene Scope Covers

scopecoat scope optics protector cover neoprene padded

ScopeCoat Scope ProtectorWith the price of premium scopes approaching $3500.00 (and beyond), it’s more important than ever to provide extra protection for your expensive optics. ScopeCoat produces covers that shield scopes with a layer of neoprene rubber (wetsuit material) sandwiched between nylon. In addition to its basic covers, sold in a variety of sizes and colors, ScopeCoat has a line of heavy-duty 6mm-thick XP-6 covers that provide added security. CLICK HERE to review the full line of ScopeCoats on Amazon.

Triple-Thickness XP-6 Model for Added Protection
The XP-6 Flak Jacket™ is specifically designed for extra protection and durability. The 6mm-thick layer of neoprene is three times thicker than the standard ScopeCoat. XP-6 Flak Jackets are designed for tall turrets, with sizes that accommodate either two or three adjustment knobs (for both side-focus and front-focus parallax models). To shield an expensive NightForce, March, or Schmidt & Bender scope, this a good choice. XP-6 covers come in black color only, and are available for both rifle-scopes and spotting scopes.

ScopeCoat Scope ProtectorThe heavily padded XP-6 Flak Jacket is also offered in a Zippered version, shown at right. This is designed for removable optics that need protection when in storage. The full-length, zippered closure goes on quick-and-easy and provides more complete protection against dust, shock, and moisture. These quality XP-6 scope covers are available on Amazon for $23-$27.

Special Covers for Binos and Red-Dots
ScopeCoat offers many specialized products, including oversize covers for spotting scopes, protective “Bino-Bibs” for binoculars, rangefinder covers, even sleeves for small pistol scopes and red-dot optics. There are also custom-designed covers for the popular Eotech and Trijicon tactical optics.

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting, Optics 1 Comment »
December 28th, 2022

TEN BEST Methods to Dry Cartridge Brass After Wet Cleaning

Wet Tumbling Brass Drier

Many shooters these days clean their cartridge brass ultrasonically, or wet-tumble their cases with stainless media (above). Both methods get brass clean and shiny, inside and out. However, when those wet-cleaning processes are completed, you’re left with a pile of soaking wet brass. How do you dry your brass quickly and efficiently, without unsightly water spots? Read on for some great answers…

In our Shooters’ Forum, Member Terry asked: “How do you dry your brass after Ultrasonic cleaning?” In a Reloading Forum Thread, many smart suggestions were posted. A dozen fellow members outlined a variety of effective case-drying procedures, which work equally well for both wet-tumbled brass and ultrasonically-cleaned cases. Here are the Top 10 brass-drying suggestions from our Forum members.

TOP TEN Ways to Dry Cartridge Brass After Wet Cleaning

1. Food Dehydrator — Shake the brass in towel to get the bulk of water off. Next leave in the food dehydrator for 45 minutes or until there are no signs of moisture inside the cases. — Lawrence97

2. Lyman 5-Level Case Dryer — Rinse off cleaning solution(s), then load brass by type into racks in Lyman Cyclone Case Dryer. This is easier to load/unload than food dehydrators and holds more cases.

Lyman Cyclone Case Drier

3. Hot Water + Compressed Air — Rinse all your cases as a batch using scalding hot water from the kitchen sink. Hot water evaporates off of brass very very quickly. Then hit them with compressed air. Takes 10 minutes. Simple. — SG4247

4. Oven Dry in Pre-Heated Oven — After pre-heating to 200° or so, turn off oven and put brass inside on a tray. Most important! Tell your wife what you are doing so she doesn’t crank it up to 425 to heat pizza! — MClark

NOTE: Many other members suggested oven drying at 150-200°. We recommend turning OFF the oven so you don’t cook your brass if you forget to remove the cases.

Dry Cartridge Brass heat gun5. Towel Dry then Warm with Heat Gun — Roll brass in a towel until no more water shakes out. Lay out on cardboard box top and blow off with Harbor Freight heat gun. $9.99 on coupon. Two minutes of heated air and about half hour of wait and they are good to go. This is with primers removed. — Shaggy357

6. Compressed Air, then Sun Dry Outside – I rinse the brass, then blow them out with compressed air. Then, dependent on the time of year, lay them on a towel in the sun. — HogPatrol

7. Dishwasher on Dry Cycle – In the winter, I drop my wet brass cases neck-down on the rack pegs in the dishwasher, then turn on the dry cycle. In the summer…well, I’m in Texas. They go to the porch for a bit. — Toolbreaker

8. Alcohol Rinse then Air or Oven Dry — Rinse in 90% Isopropyl alcohol and either let air dry or stick in 175° oven for half an hour. Alternatively, use a dehydrator. — Zipollini

9. Slow Air-Dry in Loading Blocks — I have a reloading block with holes drilled in it. I simply load the block up and let it air-dry in the cupboard for a couple of days. — JCS

10. Wipe with Towel Then Anneal Normally — This thread is stirring my OCD side. Seems complicated for just drying — my brass dries just fine when I anneal it. This entire process can’t take an hour per batch. When finished, the brass is cleaned, annealed, and ready to size. — CHLuke

  • Deprime, then tumble brass with stainless media, water, Lemishine, and dish detergent.
  • Shake them easily in a strainer to knock out most media then grab 4-5 pieces, shake them over the bucket for the last of the media then inside a towel.
  • Finally blow out the primer pockets and wipe with a towel, load in the Annealeez.

Wet Tumbling Brass Drier

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December 28th, 2022

Barrel Twist Rate and Bullet Stability — What You Need to Know

FirearmsID.com barrel rifling diagram

Understanding Twist: Bullet Stabilization

by Sierra Bullets Ballistic Technician Paul Box for Sierra Bullets Blog.

Based on the questions we get on a daily basis on our 800 (Customer Support) line, twist is one of the most misunderstood subjects in the gun field. So let’s look deeper into this mystery and get a better understanding of what twist really means.

When you see the term 1:14″ (1-14) or 1:9″ twist, just exactly what does this mean? A rifle having a 1:14″ twist means the bullet will rotate one complete revolution every fourteen inches of the barrel. Naturally a 1:9″ turns one time every nine inches that it travels down the barrel. Now, here’s something that some people have trouble with. I’ve had calls from shooters thinking that a 1:14″ twist was faster than a 1:9″ because the number was higher with the 1:14″. The easiest way to remember this is the higher the number, the slower the twist rate is.

Now, the biggest misconception is that if a shooter has a .223 with a 1:8″ twist, his rifle won’t stabilize a 55gr bullet or anything lighter. So let’s look at what is required. The longer a bullet is for its diameter, the faster the twist has to be to stabilize it. In the case of the .223 with a 1:8″ twist, this was designed to stabilize 80gr bullets in this diameter. In truth the opposite is true. A 1:8″ will spin a 55gr faster than what is required in order to stabilize that length of bullet. If you have a bullet with good concentricity in its jacket, over-spinning it will not [normally] hurt its accuracy potential. [Editor’s Note: In addition, the faster twist rate will not, normally, decrease velocity significantly. That’s been confirmed by testing done by Bryan Litz’s Applied Ballistics Labs. There may be some minor speed loss.]

FirearmsID.com barrel rifling diagram
Many barrel-makers mark the twist rate and bore dimensions on their barrel blanks.

Think of it like tires on your truck. If you have a new set of tires put on your truck, and they balance them proper at the tire shop, you can drive down a street in town at 35 MPH and they spin perfect. You can get out on the highway and drive 65 MPH and they still spin perfect. A bullet acts the same way.

Once I loaded some 35gr HP bullets in a 22-250 Ackley with a 1:8″ twist. After putting three shots down range, the average velocity was 4584 FPS with an RPM level of 412,560. The group measured .750″ at 100 yards. This is a clear example that it is hard to over-stabilize a good bullet.

Twist-rate illustration by Erik Dahlberg courtesy FireArmsID.com. Krieger barrel photo courtesy GS Arizona.
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December 28th, 2022

History of The Gun Series — Informative Videos

history of the gun flintlock breechlock repeating rifles
Matchlocks, Wheellocks, Flintlocks, Breechloaders, Lever Actions — All these historically significant firearms designs (and more) are featured in a fascinating series of videos produced by Ruger.

Sturm, Ruger & Co. has created a series of 11 short videos that trace the history of firearms, from matchlocks to modern semi-autos. Ruger’s “History of the Gun” video series provides a fascinating look at firearms technology throughout the years. The host is Garry James, Senior Editor of Guns & Ammo magazine. Featured here is Segment 7 on Rifling. Other installments in the series are linked below. If you are interested in the history of gun design and manufacturing, this series is definitely worth watching.

Flintlock mechanism
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December 27th, 2022

The Tack-Driving AR — Secrets to AR Platform Accuracy

AR-X AR15 Upper

One Shooters’ Forum member asked: “What makes an AR accurate? What parts on an AR can really affect accuracy — such as free-floating handguards, barrels, bolts, bolt carriers?” He wanted an honest, well-informed answer, not just sales pitches. Robert Whitley posted a very detailed answer to this question, based on his experience building/testing scores of AR-platform rifles. Robert runs AR-X Enterprises, which produces match-grade uppers for High Power competitors, tactical shooters, and varminters.

AR-X AR15 Upper

Building an Accurate AR — What is Most Important

by Robert Whitley
There are a lot of things that can be done to an AR to enhance consistent accuracy, and I use the words “consistent accuracy” because consistency is a part of it (i.e. plenty of guns will give a couple great 5-shot groups, but won’t do a very good 10- or 20-shot groups, and some guns will shoot great one day and not so good on others).

Here are 14 key things we think are important to accuracy.

1. Great Barrel: You’ll want a premium match-grade barrel, well-machined with a good crown and a match-type chambering, true to the bore and well cut. The extension threads must also be cut true to the bore, with everything true and in proper alignment.

2. Rigid Upper: A rigid, heavy-walled upper receiver aids accuracy. The typical AR upper receiver was made for a lightweight carry rifle and they stripped all the metal they could off it to make it light to carry (which is advantageous for the military). The net result are upper receivers that are so thin you can flex them with your bare hands. These flexible uppers are “strong enough” for general use, but they are not ideal for accuracy. Accuracy improves with a more rigid upper receiver.

3. True Receiver Face: We’ve found that truing the receiver face is valuable. Some may argue this point but it is always best to keep everything related to the barrel and the bore in complete alignment with the bore (i.e. barrel extension, bolt, upper receiver, carrier, etc.).

4. Barrel Extension: You should Loctite or glue the barrel extension into the upper receiver. This holds it in place all the way front to back in the upper receiver. Otherwise if there is any play (and there typically is) it just hangs on the face of the upper receiver completely dependent on the face of the upper receiver as the sole source of support for the barrel as opposed to being made more an integral part of the upper receiver by being glued-in.

AR-X AR15 Upper5. Gas Block: You want a gas block that does not impose pointed stress on the barrel. Clamp-on types that grab all the way around the barrel are excellent. The blocks that are pinned on with tapered pins that wedge against the barrel or the slip on type of block with set screws that push up from underneath (or directly on the barrel) can deform the bore inside of the barrel and can wreck the accuracy of an otherwise great barrel.

6. Free-Float Handguard: A rigid, free-float handguard (and I emphasize the word rigid) really makes a difference. There are many types of free-float handguards and a free-float handguard is, in and of itself, a huge improvement over a non-free-float set up, but best is a rigid set-up. Some of the ones on the market are small diameter, thin and/or flexible and if you are shooting off any type of rest, bipod, front bag, etc., a rigid fore-end is best since ARs want to jump, bounce and twist when you let a shot go, as the carrier starts to begin its cycle before the bullet exits the bore.

Robert Whitley AR Accurate accuracy aR15 barrel trigger MSR gunsmithing

7. Barrel Contour: You want some meat on the barrel. Between the upper receiver and the gas block don’t go real thin with a barrel (we like 1″ diameter if it’s workable weight-wise). When you touch off a round and the bullet passes the gas port, the gas system immediately starts pressuring up with a gas impulse that provides vibrations and stress on the barrel, especially between the gas block back to the receiver. A heavier barrel here dampens that. Staying a little heavier with barrel contour through the gas block area and out to the muzzle is good for the same reasons. ARs have a lot going on when you touch off a round and the gas system pressures up and the carrier starts moving (all before the bullet exits the bore) so the more things are made heavier and rigid to counteract that the better — within reason (I’m not advocating a 12-lb barrel).

8. Gas Tube Routing Clearance: You want a gas tube that runs freely through the barrel nut, through the front of the upper receiver, and through the gas key in the carrier. Ensure the gas tube is not impinged by any of them, so that it does not load the carrier in a stressed orientation. You don’t want the gas tube bound up so that when the gas tube pressures up it immediately wants to transmit more force and impulse to the barrel than would normally occur. We sometimes spend a lot of time moving the gas block with gas tube on and off new build uppers and tweaking gas tubes to get proper clearance and alignment. Most gas tubes do need a little “tweaking” to get them right — factory tubes may work OK but they typically do not function optimally without hand-fitting.

9. Gas Port Tuning: You want to avoid over-porting the gas port. Being over-gassed makes the gas system pressure up earlier and more aggressively. This causes more impulse, and increases forces and vibration affecting the top end and the barrel. Tune the gas port to give the amount of pressure needed to function properly and adequately but no more.

10. Front/Back Bolt Play: If accuracy is the game, don’t leave a lot of front/back bolt play (keep it .003″ but no more than .005″). We’ve seen factory rifles run .012″ to .015″ play, which is OK if you need to leave room for dirt and grime in a military application. However, that amount of play is not ideal for a high-accuracy AR build. A lot of front/back bolt play allows rounds to be hammered into the chamber and actually re-formed in a non-consistent way, as they are loaded into the chamber.

11. Component Quality: Use good parts from a reputable source and be wary of “gun show specials”. All parts are NOT the same. Some are good, some are not so good, and some aftermarket parts are simply bad. Don’t be afraid to use mil-spec-type carriers; by and large they are excellent for an accuracy build. Also, remember that just because a carrier says “National Match” or something else on it does not necessarily mean it’s any better. Be wary of chrome-plated parts as the chrome plating can change the parts dimensionally and can also make it hard to do hand-fitting for fit and function.

AR-X AR15 Upper

12. Upper to Lower Fit: A good upper/lower fit is helpful. For quick and dirty fit enhancement, an Accu-Wedge in the rear helps a lot. The ultimate solution is to bed the upper to a specific lower so that the upper and lower, when together, are more like one integral unit. For the upper receivers we produce, we try to get the specs as close as we can, but still fit the various lowers in the market place.

13. Muzzle Attachments: Don’t screw up the muzzle (literally). Leave as much metal on the barrel at the muzzle as you can. People like to thread the muzzle for a flash hider, suppressor, muzzle brake, or some other attachment, but if you really want accuracy, leave as much metal as you can there. And, if you have something that screws on, set it up so that it can be put on and have it stay there without putting a lot of torque and stress on it right where the bullet exits the bore. If you are going to thread the end of the barrel, make it concentric with the bore and make sure what you screw on there is as well. For all muzzle attachments, also ensure that the holes through which the bullet passes through are dead true to the bore. Many aftermarket screw-on things are not so good that way. Anything that vents gas should vent symmetrically (i.e. if it vents left, it should vent equally right, and likewise, if it vents up, it should vent down equally). Uneven venting of gas can wreck accuracy.

14. Quality Ammunition: Ammo is a whole story by itself, but loads that are too hot typically shoot poorly in an AR-15. If you want accuracy out of an AR-15, avoid overly hot loads. Shown below are test groups shot with four (4) different uppers, all with moderate loads. These four uppers all pretty much had the same features and things done to them as explained in this article, and they all shot great.

AR-X AR15 Upper

Robert Whitley
www.6mmAR.com

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December 27th, 2022

Great .22 LR Rimfire Ammo Comparison Test — 31 Types Tested

Shooting Sports USA .22 LR 22LR Rimfire ammunition test subsonic hi-velocity lead-free hyper velocity suppressor match ammo plinking varmint hunting

Here’s a “must-read” article for .22 LR rimfire shooters. The October 2018 issue of Shooting Sports USA (SSUSA) includes a great article with data on thirty-one (31) different types of popular .22 LR rimfire ammunition. The line-up includes low-speed, standard, and Hi-Velocity types, plus choices for plinking, varminting, and target applications. Brands tested include: Aguila, American Eagle, CCI, Federal, Fiocchi, Lapua, Remington, and Winchester. The slowest ammo, CCI Quiet-22 Lead RN, clocked 727 FPS. The fastest ammo, CCI Short-Range Green Lead-Free HP, ran 1735 FPS, 2.4 times the speed of the Quiet-22.

SSUSA .22 LR Rimfire Ammo TEST | SSUSA October 2018 Issue

For each ammo type, SSUSA lists the bullet weight, velocity (FPS), and average of two, 5-shot groups at fifty yards. The most accurate ammo was Lapua Center-X LRN, with a 0.37″ average 50-yard group size. Second best was Lapua X-ACT LRN at 0.42″. Ammo was tested from a bench with a Cooper Model 57-M rifle fitted with 3-9x33mm Leupold VX-2 scope. The ammo offerings were grouped into three categories: (1) Varmints/Small Game; (2) Target; and (3) Plinking. (See ammo tables below.)

Shooting Sports USA .22 LR 22LR Rimfire ammunition test subsonic hi-velocity lead-free hyper velocity suppressor match ammo plinking varmint hunting
Click for larger page-view.

Different types of .22 LR (Long Rifle) rimfire ammo have different applications. Subsonic ammo, typically, is best for 25m to 50m target work with precision rimfire rigs. Hi-Velocity .22 LR ammo provides a flatter trajectory for longer ranges. SSUSA explains: “The array of .22 LR loads… turns a person’s head every which way. Subsonic target loads are the key to decisive accuracy on targets, while hyper-velocity cartridges provide striking bullet expansion on small varmints. In between, standard and high-velocity .22 LRs are loaded with a variety of bullet weights and styles for everything from small-game hunting to plinking[.]” READ Full SSUSA .22 LR Rimfire Ammo Story.

Rimfire Ammo Article tip from EdLongrange.
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December 27th, 2022

Important Safety Practices for New Gun Owners

ssusa gun safe safety video

The NRA has produced a good video on general principles of gun safety. New shooters should definitely watch this video, which provides many important reminders for long-time gun owners as well. This video and other safety principles are featured in a Shooting Sports USA article.

While at the range, shooters should practice Three Basic Rules:

1) Always keep the gun pointed in a safe direction.
2) Always keep your finger OFF the trigger until ready to shoot.
3) Always keep the gun UNLOADED until ready to use.

In addition, whenever you are shooting, indoors or outdoors, know what is behind your target and never shoot if there is not a safe backstop. With a centerfire rifle at an outdoor range, just a few degrees of elevation can cause a shot to impact more than a mile away.

rifle angle safety shooting

Store Guns Safely When Not in Use
After your range sessions or hunts, is vital to store all guns safely. We recommend storing all firearms (pistols, rifles, shotguns) in a sturdy gun safe with thick steel walls. Use a GoldenRod or other device to control humidity inside the safe. We also like to use Bore-Stores or other treated gun sacks to help protect against corrosion.

ssusa gun safe safety video

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December 26th, 2022

BargainFinder 379: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

AccurateShooter Deals of the Week Weekly Bargain Finder Sale Discount Savings

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Sunday afternoon or Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

NOTE: All listed products are for sale to persons 18 years of age or older. No products are intended for use by minors.

1. Precision Reloading — Lee PRO 1000 Press Package, $189.99

lee press sale
Amazing deal on Progressive Press with Case Feeder for loading pistol ammo

If you want the efficiency of a progressive press, but have a limited budget, consider the Lee Pro 1000 Progressive Reloading Press. This reloading kit includes 3-station press, dies (Carbide FL Sizing, Powder-Through Expanding, and Bullet Seating Dies), 3-Hole Turret, Shell Plate, Powder Measure, Universal Case Feeder, and priming system. Yes that’s right this $189.99 Kit includes the case feeder! Order the kit for your favorite cartridge type including: .32 S&W, .38 Auto/.38 Super, .38 Spl/.357 Mag, .380 ACP, .45 Colt, .45 ACP, and .223 Remington. NOTE: Lee cautions that “Only CCI or Remington brand primers are safe to use with this press”. While this is a great deal it’s best suited for pistol cartridge loading. BONUS: Also, through 11:59 PM CST on 12/26/2022 you save 10% on orders over $75 with Code 122522.

2. Midsouth — RCBS Rebel Master Reloading Kit, $349.99

rcbs press sale
Kit offers good press and big savings over price of individual tools

The RCBS Rebel Master Reloading Kit offers everything you need to get started with precision hand-loading. On sale now for just $349.99 at Midsouth, this package includes: Rebel Single-Stage Press, Uniflow-III Powder Measure, 1500 grain digital scale, hand priming tool, powder funnel, hex key set, chamfer/deburring tool, accessory handle with case neck and primer pocket brushes, case loading block, and spray lube. You even get a Speer #15 loading manual. This is a heck of a deal for $349.00 with FREE Shipping. You could pay $200 for just a good single-stage press alone.

3. Sportsman’s Warehouse — Savage Rascal Sale + Rebate

Savage junior rascal rifle sale rebate
Savage junior rascal rifle sale rebate
Good little bolt-action training rifle, now with REBATE

The Savage Rascal is a great starter rifle for new shooters. This compact, single-shot, bolt-action rimfire comes in a variety of stock colors and patterns. Purchase one by 12/31/2022 and get a $25 mail-in Savage rebate. These Savage Rascal Rifles feature laminated stocks, threaded (1/2-28) barrels, and modern aesthetics. Though sized for younger shooters, the design shares full-size rifle features, including Savage’s user-adjustable AccuTrigger system.

4. Amazon — Magpul Bipod, $66.00

magpul bipod sale
Quality, sturdy yet light-weight bipod

Looking for a lightweight, easy-to-mount yet stable bipod? The modern Magpul MOE Bipod features injection molded components for weight reduction while still retaining the functionality, strength, and value of Magpul’s all-metal bipods. It’s easy to mount the MOE bipod using the rapid-attach mounting system that attaches securely to sling wwivel studs on the rifle forearm — no track required.

5. Amazon — RCBS Hand Priming Tool, $33.99

rcbs primer sale
Very good price on an quality, durable hand-priming tool

Shopping for a very reliable hand priming tool at a bargain price? We recommend the RCBS 90200 Hand Priming tool. This durable tool seats primers quickly and safely, with plenty of leverage. The unit ships with BOTH large and small primer plugs. A safety mechanism separates the seating operation from the primer supply, significantly reducing the the possibility of tray detonation. Yes there are better, high-end hand priming tools, but you might have to pay $80+ to get noticeably better performance.

6. KYGUNCO — Taurus TX22 Competition, $419.99

taurus pistol sale
Affordable .22 LR match pistol with compensator has earned positive reviews

Rimfire pistols let you enjoy action pistol competitions without spending a ton of money. Among .22 LR pistols, the Taurus TX22 Competition SCR offers great performance for the price. The TX22 Competition SCR builds features a precision-engineered slide and match-grade bull barrel. The “skeletonized” slide with enlarged ejection port is designed so that a red dot optic can be mounted to the barrel. That helps prevent problems during ejection of empty shells. Taurus claims this mounting configuration enhances accuracy compared to a slide-mounted optic platform.

7. Midway — Caldwell Front Rest & Rear Bag, $99.99

caldwell rest sale
Great price on good set-up for sighting-in hunting rifles

Need a good basic front rest and rear bag to sight-in that hunting rifle or do load development? Here’s a solid, functional benchrest set-up at a great price. This Caldwell Rock BR Rest and Bag Combo is great combo deal for just $99.99. This will more than suffice for testing a hunting rifle or basic bench-work. Upgrade the rear bag later. The front rest adjusts for both windage and elevation. This is a GREAT deal — consider that the Caldwell Rock BR Rest by itself sells for $179.99 at Sportsmans.com.

8. Midsouth — Year-End RCBS Sale, Save Big Plus Free Shipping

rcbs chargemaster link supreme rock chucker sale midsouth free shipping
Great prices on top-tier items plus FREE Shipping

Along with the Rebel Master Reloading Kit listed above, Midsouth is running a major sale on other popular RCBS products. You’ll find major discounts plus FREE Shipping. Get a ChargeMaster Supreme Scale/Dispenser for $379.99 or a ChargeMaster Link for $269.99, both with FREE Shipping. The Rock Chucker Supreme is discounted to $169.99 ($40 off) with FREE Shipping, and the RCBS Case Prep Center is now $339.99 ($50 Off), with FREE Shipping.

9. Amazon — Hearing Protection and Shooting Glasses, $35.99

safety shooting glasses muffs sale
Excellent kit with 30 NRR muffs plus TWO sets of safety eyewear

Nearly every time we’re at the range we see people without proper eye and/or ear protection. For under $40 you can get excellent protection with this Earmuffs and Safety Lenses Kit. You get a comfortable set of 30 db NRR earmuffs plus TWO sets of protective glasses, all housed in a handy carry kit. The ANSI Z87.1-approved lenses are Anti-Fog and scratch-resistant. We like having a choice of lens colors — the clear lenses provide max light transmission while the yellow lenses offer enhanced contrast and work well on overcast days. If you do a lot of indoor training, this is a very good kit for the price.

10. MidwayUSA — MTM 4-Can Ammo Crate, $27.52

ammo can sale
Great system that hold many pounds of ammo securely

This MTM ammo crate is popular with our readers. The MTM AC4C Ammo Carrier features four lockable polymer ammo cans in a fitted, four-slot 23.5″ x 11.3″ x 7.5″ carry crate. This makes it easy to haul four full ammo cans. Actual purchasers have raved: “Moments after I received this storage box set I ordered another. Very well-built and great design — a steal at the price.” The system includes four lockable, O-Ring 11.3″ x 7.2″ x 5″ ammo cans (AC30T) for multi-caliber ammo storage. The crate even includes tie-down points for transport in a cart or ATV. This is on sale now at MidwayUSA for $27.52 or $34.27 on Amazon.

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