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May 8th, 2022

Sunday GunDay: New Anschutz 1710 for NRL22 and PRS Rimfire

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

If you are looking to compete in NRL22 or PRS rimfire tactical matches, there is a new, turnkey solution that combines the legendary Anschutz 54 rimfire action with the excellent MDT ACC chassis. Called the Anschutz Model 1710, this new competition-ready rifle is capable of winning matches right out of the box. Creedmoor Sports recently received the first set of model 1710s in the USA. At our request, Creedmoor’s Brent Books and Wayne Dayberry field-tested a new model 1710. After confirming the elevation click values for various yardages, Brent put the Anschutz through its paces, showing its superb accuracy. FYI, this 1710 came with an impressive factory test target — 10 shots at 50 meters, all in a dime-sized circle.

Shooting at the CMP Talladega Marksmanship range, Brent ran a sequence of shots, hitting steel at 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 yards without a miss. You can see this 5-shot sequence, all in one continuous take (no edits), in the video below. As Brent observed, “it definitely shoots”. Then, later, Brent cranked in more elevation (21.1 MILs) and hit steel at 435 yards. Watch this all in the video — it’s impressive!

Anschutz 1710 at Talladega, Drilling Steel from 100 to 435 Yards

Watch Hits at 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, and 435 Yards

With RWS 100 .22 LR ammo, Brent drills hit after hit with no misses out to 300 yards.

“This video shows a run after we confirmed our dope. Brent Books and I are shooting an NRL22 match in two weeks. Although he has extensive smallbore and airgun experience, this will be his first match of this type. I thought it would be a good/fun exercise for him to run the plates fairly quickly and also showcase the performance of this rifle system at the same time on the video.” — Wayne Dayberry

Anschutz Model 1710 — Great Accuracy Right from the Start

Report by Wayne Dayberry
The Anschutz 1710 MDT ACC rifle system is purpose-built for smallbore tactical precision rifle competition. With its capabilities we went from from bore-sight to 300 yards in just 12 shots. We started with a factory-fresh .22 LR Anschutz 1710 in an MDT ACC Ghost Gray chassis. This rifle incorporates a 20-inch heavy profile threaded stainless barrel and the 5119 two-stage trigger. After a clean, lube, and inspection, we mounted up an Element 5-25x56mm First Focal Plane optic we already had in a set of rings and headed out to the CMP Talladega Marksmanship Park. In addition to traditional target ranges, the CMP range has an unknown distance steel range with targets out to 600 yards. Due to a compressed schedule, we did not have time to follow the traditional zeroing and velocity-gathering processes, so we headed straight to the unknown distance steel range. This range has steel from 75 yards to 600 yards much like you would see in PRS and NRL type competitions.

Given the compressed timeframe, we didn’t follow the traditional steps one would normally take to do a break-in process, zero, collect data, and build out rifle dope. We were essentially doing all of that on a steel target range as we were putting the first rounds down the barrel while shooting this piece. At the same time, with a quality rifle system, and following a process, it worked out well as we were able to stretch out the capability of this rifle to 435 yards very quickly.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

Anschutz 1710 Components and Specifications:
The new Anschutz model 1710 is built with premium components top to bottom. It features an Anschutz Match 54 repeater action with blued receiver, Anschutz 5119 two-stage trigger, 20″ stainless steel barrel, and MDT ACC alloy chassis with built-in rails. The chassis is adjustable for LOP and cheek height.

Receiver: Scope mount attachment with 11mm rail and drilled and tapped
Barrel Length: 20″ stainless steel heavy barrel, no iron sights
Chamber: Optimized Match Chamber
Crown: Recessed Target Crown
Muzzle Diameter: 0.90″
Trigger: New 5119 Two-Stage Trigger
Trigger Weight Range: 4 oz. to 7.5 oz. (110 to 215g)
Trigger Weight: Adjusted to 6.35 oz. (180g)
Magazine Capacity: 10
Magazine Release: Extended
Rifle Weight without scope: 10 lbs., 10 oz.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis
This photo shows the Anschutz 1710 fitted with bipod and suppressor. The tripod clamps via the integral forearm ARCA rail.

Testing the Anschutz 1710 on Steel — Expedited Procedure

The closest steel on the Talladega range that day was 75 yards so we started from scratch at that distance. Brent was on the rifle, so I spotted and ran ballistics. After bore-sighting at 75 yards, and confirming zero on steel with a few rounds, we went to the ballistic solver to start a profile. For the RWS R100 ammunition we were running, I entered a G1 BC of .14 and a guess at the muzzle velocity of 1080 FPS. The call of 1.1 MILs for the 100-yard steel resulted in Brent’s shot landing .2 MILs high of center on the first round; we “confirmed” 0.9 MILs. We noted the impact and moved on to 150 yards.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

As I mentioned we were very short on time so the “confirmations” of our dope for our first pass were with a single shot and measuring in the reticle. That’s obviously not the normal process, but for us, it was good enough for this exercise, given the time we had. We were shooting on freshly-painted targets and getting excellent feedback to see POA / POI deviations and could easily measure this in the reticle, which helped. And we were shooting a top-of-the-line Anschutz which came with a confirmation test target showing a 10-shot group at 50 meters with all shots touching and within a circle the size of a dime. With a former NCAA All-American smallbore shooter running the gun, and this test target in hand, confidence was high.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

Moving to the 150-yard target, a call of 3.7 MILs hit 0.6 high on our first round so we measured and confirmed 3.1. We trued the muzzle velocity in the solver as we went. At 200 yards I called 6.0 MILs and the first round hit was .3 high. We measured and confirmed 5.7 MILs. 9.0 mils was the call at 250 yards and we hit just a bit high. After measuring, we confirmed 8.6 MILs. At 300 yards, Brent was holding about 1 mil wind as a storm started rolling in. I called 12.5 MILs elevation and the first round impact was near the top of the plate, and after measuring we confirmed a come up of 11.7 MILs.

The net result was this — we went from mounting the optic and bore-sighting, to making solid first-round impacts from 100 yards out to 300 yards, at each 50-yard increment, in just 12 rounds! That’s efficiency!

Stretching it out to 435 Yards on Steel
Later, we went on to make solid hits at 350 yards and 435 yards. I got on the gun and put two on top of each other at 350 yards — pretty cool. This just proved this gun is an absolute hammer. The 435-yard target was a bear target, which was quite a bit larger than the 12″ steel we were shooting in the video. Not a small target by any means, but we were shooting 435 yards with a rimfire rifle as a storm rolled in. I think between us, Brent and I hit 5 of 6 (at 435 yards) which was pretty good given the sporty conditions. Next stop… the 600-yard plates at the end of this range. That’s a come-up of about 36 Mils.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

Rimfire Maintenance — Tips from a Top Competitor
An NCAA All-American smallbore shooter, Brent Books knows a thing or two about rimfire rifles, and how to maintain optimal accuracy. Brent told us: “I shot on the rifle team at Jacksonville State University so 500 rounds a week was common through my Anschutz 2013. I’d clean my rifle at the end of each week before we travelled to a competition with a wet patch through the barrel, a few passes of the nylon brush (unscrewing the brush before pulling it back through), one more wet patch, and then dry patches until they came out clean. A bore guide was always used to protect my action from debris and to align the cleaning rod. After cleaning the barrel, I’d completely disassemble the bolt to clean and lube it, making sure the bolt would glide effortlessly in the action. After cleaning, I’d shoot a minimum of 50 rounds to foul the barrel with ammo I was using to compete.”

Anschutz Model 54 Action with 5119 Trigger

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

The Anschutz 1710 features the competition-proven Model 54 action, running a 10-round magazine. In the 1710, the safety-equipped action is fitted with an outstanding 5119 two-stage trigger that adjusts from 4 to 7.5 ounces. First released in 1954, Anschutz Match 54 action still represents a benchmark for smallbore rifles. Match rifles fitted with Model 54 actions have captured numerous World Championships and Olympic medals. These actions are smooth, consistent, and ultra-reliable, making them a great choice for multiple smallbore rifle disciplines. Anschutz boasts that this action has: “solid, extremely reliable construction [with] a functional safety that does not fail even under the most adverse conditions.”

MDT Adjustable Core Competition (ACC) Chassis

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

What’s so cool about the MDT ACC Chassis? MDT’s ACC chassis is optimized for NRL and PRS shooting formats, although it can be used in other disciplines. The ACC chassis design has been optimized with input from top PRS and NRL shooters. Key features include: full 17″ ARCA/RRS fore-end, flared magazine well, extended barricade stop, widened thumb shelf, adjustable cheek riser, adjustable length-of-pull, and adjustable MDT Vertical Grip Elite.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

The ACC boasts an integrated weight management system, allowing shooters to fine tune chassis weight and balance. Weights can be added to the buttstock, the fore-end interior or fore-end exterior. This allows the shooter to increase the chassis-only weight from 4.5 lbs up to 12.3 lbs. Complete with barreled action, scope, rings, bipod, and accessories, shooters can run 20+ lbs for the full rig.

The weight can be tuned without taking the barreled action out of the chassis. Internal fore-end weights can be inserted from the front of the fore-end and screwed in place, while external M-LOK-compatible weights can be easily attached on either side of the fore-end. This ACC weight-management system allows shooters to rapidly adjust the feel and recoil characteristics of their system.

Recommended Accessories

Creedmoor Sports stocks a large variety of products that can be used with the Anschutz 1710. Below you’ll find the Element Titan 5-25x56mm FFP MRAD scope, Soup Can Sandbag, and RWS R100 Ammunition used for the Anschutz 1710 testing featured here. Click each item below for more product information:

Element Titan 5-25x56mm Scope

titan ffp 5-25x56 scope PRS NRL

Creedmoor Soup Can Sandbag

titan soup can sandbag NRL

RWS .22 LR R100 Ammo

rws R100 .22 lr rimfire ammo

Creedmoor Sports

Permalink Competition, Gear Review, Tactical 2 Comments »
May 8th, 2022

Dance of the Aussie Windflags — Slow-Motion Windflag Videos


Photo of Aussie Wind Flags courtesy BRT Shooters Supply.

A while back our Aussie friend Stuart Elliot of BRT Shooters Supply recently filmed some interesting videos at the QTS range in Brisbane, Australia. Stuart told us: “I was shooting in an Air Gun Benchrest match here in Brisbane, Australia. I finished my target early and was awaiting the cease fire and took a short, slow-motion video of windflag behavior.” You may be surprised by the velocity changes and angle swings that occur, even over a relatively short distance (just 25 meters from bench to target).

Here are windflags in slow motion:

The flags show in the videos are “Aussie Wind Flags”, developed by Stuart Elliot. These are sold in the USA by Butch Lambert, through Shadetree Engineering.

Here is a video in real time:

Stuart says this video may surprise some shooters who don’t use windflags: “Many people say the wind doesn’t matter. Well it sure does — whether for an airgun at 25 meters or a long range centerfire at 1,000.” This video illustrates how much the wind can change direction and velocity even in a small area.

Permalink - Videos, Competition, Shooting Skills No Comments »
May 8th, 2022

Bullet Concentricity and Alignment — What You Need to Know

Sinclair concentricity 101 eccentricity run-out reloading plans

Sinclair International reloading toolsSinclair International has released an interesting article about Case Concentricity* and bullet “run-out”. This instructional article by Bob Kohl explains the reasons brass can exhibit poor concentricity, and why high bullet run-out can be detrimental to accuracy.

Concentricity, Bullet Alignment, and Accuracy by Bob Kohl
The purpose of loading your own ammo is to minimize all the variables that can affect accuracy and can be controlled with proper and conscientious handloading. Concentricity and bullet run-out are important when you’re loading for accuracy. Ideally, it’s important to strive to make each round the same as the one before it and the one after it. It’s a simple issue of uniformity.

The reason shooters work with tools and gauges to measure and control concentricity is simple: to make sure the bullet starts down the bore consistently in line with the bore. If the case isn’t properly concentric and the bullet isn’t properly aligned down the center of the bore, the bullet will enter the rifling inconsistently. While the bore might force the bullet to align itself with the bore (but normally it doesn’t), the bullet may be damaged or overstressed in the process – if it even it corrects itself in transit. These are issues we strive to remedy by handloading, to maintain the best standard possible for accurate ammunition.

The term “concentricity” is derived from “concentric circle”. In simple terms it’s the issue of having the outside of the cartridge in a concentric circle around the center. That goes from case head and center of the flash hole, to the tip of the bullet.

Factors Affecting Concentricity

The point of using this term is to identify a series of issues that affect accurate ammunition. Ideally this would work best with a straight-walled case; but since most rifle cartridge cases are tapered, it equates to the smallest cross section that can be measured point by point to verify the concentric circle around the center. For the examples below, I’m working with .308 Winchester ammo.

Concentricity run-out cartridge case
Figure 1: The cartridge.

Concentricity run-out cartridge case
Figure 2: Centerline axis of the case, extending from flash hole to case mouth.

The case walls have to be in perfect alignment with the center, or axis, of that case, even if it’s measured at a thousandth of an inch per segment (in a tapered case).

Concentricity run-out cartridge case
Figure 3: Case body in alignment with its axis, or centerline, even in a tapered case.

The case neck must also be in alignment with its axis. By not doing so you can have erratic bullet entry into the bore. The case neck wall itself should be as uniform as possible in alignment and in thickness (see the M80 7.62x51mm NATO cartridge in Figure 5) and brass can change its alignment and shape. It’s why we expand the case neck or while some folks ream the inside of the neck and then turn the outside for consistent thickness, which affects the tension on the bullet when seated.

Concentricity run-out cartridge case
Figure 4: Neck in alignment with center of the case axis.

Concentricity run-out cartridge case
Figure 5: Variations in case neck wall thickness, especially on some military brass, can cause an offset of the bullet in its alignment. This is an M80 ball round. Note the distinct difference of the neck walls.

Having a ball micrometer on hand helps, especially with military brass like 7.62x51mm in a semi-auto rifle, where there are limits as to how thin you want the neck walls to be. In the case of 7.62 ball brass you want to keep the wall to .0145″.

Concentricity run-out cartridge case
Figure 6: A ball micrometer like this RCBS tool (#100-010-268) can measure case neck thickness.

Turning the outside of the neck wall is important with .308 military cases regardless of whether you expand or ream the neck walls. There are several outside neck turning tools from Forster, Hornady, Sinclair, and others. I’ve been using classic Forster case trimming (#100-203-301) and neck turning (#749-012-890) tools for 40 years.

Bullet Run-Out
The cartridge, after being loaded, still needs to be in alignment with the center of the case axis. Figure 7 shows a bad example of this, a round of M80 ball. A tilted bullet is measured for what’s known as bullet “run-out”.

Concentricity run-out cartridge case
Figure 7: An M80 round with the bullet tilted and not aligned with the axis. This will be a flyer!

Run-out can be affected by several things: (1) improperly indexing your case while sizing, which includes not using the proper shell holder, especially while using a normal expander ball on the sizing die (it also can stretch the brass). (2) The head of a turret press can flex; and (3) improper or sloppy bullet seating. This is also relevant when it comes to using a progressive press when trying to load accuracy ammo.

Mid Tompkins came up with a simple solution for better bullet seating years ago. Seat your bullet half way into the case, back off the seater die and rotate the case 180 degrees before you finish seating the bullet. It cuts down on run-out problems, especially with military brass. You also want to gently ream the inside of the neck mouth to keep from having any brass mar the surface of the bullet jacket and make proper seating easier. A tilted bullet often means a flyer.

Concentricity run-out cartridge case
Figure 8: Proper alignment from the center of the case head to the tip of the bullet.

CLICK HERE to READ FULL ARTICLE With More Photos and Tips »


*Actually some folks would say that if we are talking about things being off-center or out-of-round, we are actually talking about “eccentricity”. But the tools we use are called “Concentricity Gauges” and Concentricity is the term most commonly used when discussing this subject.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading, Tech Tip No Comments »